Health Blog


Does Fish Oil Slow Ageing?

Posted in Health Articles by Pulse Health Screening on October 20, 2010
Tags: , , ,

Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oils have a direct effect on biological ageing, US research suggests

Fish oil may be the true elixir of youth, according to new evidence of its effect on biological ageing. Omega-3 fatty acids from fish oil preserve the genetic “fuse” that determines the lifespan of cells, say scientists.

The discovery, made in heart disease patients, may explain many of the claimed health benefits of omega-3.

Taking fish oil supplements is said to protect against heart disease, improve survival rates after a heart attack, reduce mental decline in old age and help to prevent age-related changes in the eye that can lead to blindness. Research has also shown that rodents live one-third longer when given a diet enriched with fish-derived omega-3.

Although omega-3 fatty acids have powerful anti-inflammatory properties and lower levels of some blood fats, the mechanisms behind these effects are poorly understood. The new research suggests that omega-3 has a direct effect on biological ageing by slowing down the rate at which protective caps on the ends of chromosomes shorten.

The caps, called telomeres, are made from copied strands of DNA and have a similar function to bookends or the plastic ends of shoelaces. They prevent the ends of chromosomes – the “packages” of DNA in the cell nucleus – becoming damaged and keep the DNA organised and contained.

Each time a cell divides, its telomeres get shorter until a critical point is reached. DNA then becomes damaged and the cell stops dividing, and may die. In this way, the telomere acts like a biological fuse.

The rate at which the fuse “burns” can vary both between individual people and individual cells. This is believed to have an impact on age-related diseases.
US scientists conducting the research looked at the effect of omega-3 fatty acids on telomere shortening in 608 hospital out-patients with heart disease. At the start of the study, measurements were taken of the length of chromosomal telomeres in the patients’ white blood cells.

The tests were carried out again after five years, and showed a clear correlation with omega-3 intake. Patients consuming the least omega-3 had the fastest rate of telomere shortening, while those in the top 25% of consumption levels had the slowest rate.

The scientists, led by Dr Ramin Farzaneh-Far of the University of California at San Francisco, wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association: “The present findings identify deceleration of telomere attrition as a potentially novel pathway for the anti-ageing effects of marine omega-3 fatty acids.

“In summary, among patients with stable coronary artery disease, there was an inverse relationship between baseline blood levels of marine omega-3 fatty acids and the rate of telomere shortening over five years … These findings raise the possibility that omega-3 fatty acids may protect against cellular ageing in patients with coronary heart disease.”

To find a quality fish oil supplement, go to www.healthychoices.co.uk/order.html

Advertisements

Noni Fruit For Pain Relief

Posted in Health Articles by Pulse Health Screening on May 12, 2010
Tags: , , ,

Noni, also known as Morinda citrifolia, is a fruit that has been consumed for thousands of years and can be found in various parts of the world, but it is most well known today as the Polynesian superfood from Hawaii and Tahiti. It is capable of growing in difficult terrains including areas where volcanoes have erupted and deposited lava. This superfruit is truly volcanic in its ability to deliver a wide range of healing benefits. Of particular note is its potential for providing relief from pain.

Dr. Ralph Heinicke first began to study the compounds in noni in the 1970`s at the University of Hawaii. There, he discovered a key phytonutrient found in noni called xeronine, which he patented in 1981. He found that this ingredient, as well as proxeronine – which makes up the building blocks of xeronine – played a key role in noni`s ability to assist in the management of pain.

The body already makes some proxeronine, and subsequently, xeronine, but it tends to be in short supply relative to demands for it throughout the body. The primary function of xeronine in the body is to regulate the shape and rigidity of certain proteins and help manage a wide range of physiological responses. Normally, proxeronine is stored in the liver and is periodically released into the bloodstream for absorption by organs as needed. Human tissue cells contain receptor sites for the absorption of xeronine. Regarding pain relief, xeronine converts certain brain receptor proteins into active sites for the absorption of endorphins. Studies have shown an analgesic (pain relief) effect in mice, and in a 1990 study of 10,000 patients testing the efficacy of noni for a wide range of health issues, pain reduction was registered by 88% of the studies` participants.

While noni has only minimal amounts of xeronine, it has enormous quantities of proxeronine, which is the precursor for xeronine that provides the raw materials for its production. Dr. Heinicke also found that noni contains proxeroninase, an enzyme which plays a key role in the synthesis of xeronine and serotonin, a process which is enhanced even further when taken on an empty stomach.

Noni is most commonly consumed as a liquid. Considering that much of noni`s nutrient profile includes what is found in the pulp of the fruit, look for products that include the pulp. It can take a period of time to get acclimated to the taste of noni, as it tends to have a pungent odor and bitter taste, but the benefits are well worth it.

Source: Article by William Rufolf at Natural News 12/05/2010

There are a number of companies producing nutritional products with Noni. Neways International is one such company and they have produced a formula which tastes delicious. To read about the other benefits of this product check out Hawaiian Noni. It is available from Healthy Choices.